Environmental Protection (Water and Wetland Biodiversity) Policy 2019


Queensland Crest

Part 1 Preliminary

1Short title

This policy may be cited as the Environmental Protection (Water and Wetland Biodiversity) Policy 2019.

2Commencement

This regulation commences on 1 September 2019.

3Definitions

The dictionary in schedule 2 defines particular words used in this policy.

Part 2 Application and purpose of policy

4Application of policy

This policy applies to waters and wetlands.

5Purpose

(1)The purpose of this policy is to achieve the object of the Act in relation to waters and wetlands.

Note—

See section 3 of the Act.
(2)The purpose is achieved by—
(a)identifying environmental values for waters and wetlands to be enhanced or protected; and
(b)identifying management goals for waters; and
(c)stating water quality guidelines and water quality objectives for enhancing or protecting the environmental values of waters; and
(d)providing a framework for making consistent, equitable and informed decisions about waters; and
(e)monitoring and reporting on the condition of waters.

Part 3 Basic concepts

6Environmental values for waters

(1)The environmental values of waters to be enhanced or protected under this policy are—
(a)for water mentioned in schedule 1, column 1—the environmental values stated in the document opposite the water in schedule 1, column 2; or
(b)for other water—the environmental values stated in subsection (2).
(2)For subsection (1)(b), the environmental values are—
(a)for high ecological value waters—the biological integrity of an aquatic ecosystem that is effectively unmodified or highly valued; or

Example of a highly valued aquatic ecosystem—

an aquatic ecosystem used for drinking water
(b)for slightly disturbed waters—the biological integrity of an aquatic ecosystem that has effectively unmodified biological indicators, but slightly modified physical, chemical or other indicators; or
(c)for moderately disturbed waters—the biological integrity of an aquatic ecosystem that is adversely affected by human activity to a relatively small but measurable degree; or
(d)for highly disturbed waters—the biological integrity of an aquatic ecosystem that is measurably degraded and of lower ecological value than waters mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (c); or
(e)for waters from which aquatic foods intended for human consumption are taken—the suitability of the water for producing the foods for human consumption; or
(f)for waters that may be used for aquaculture—the suitability of the water for aquacultural use; or
(g)for waters that may be used for agricultural purposes—the suitability of the water for agricultural purposes; or
(h)for waters that may be used for recreation or aesthetic purposes—the suitability of the water for—
(i)primary recreational use; or
(ii)secondary recreational use; or
(iii)visual recreational use; or
(i)for waters that may be used for drinking water—the suitability of the water for supply as drinking water having regard to the level of treatment of the water; or
(j)for waters that may be used for industrial purposes—the suitability of the water for industrial use; or
(k)the cultural and spiritual values of the water.
(3)In this section—
cultural and spiritual values, of water, means its scientific, social or other significance to the present generation or past or future generations, including Aboriginal people or Torres Strait Islanders.
primary recreational use, of water, means a use that involves the following types of contact with the water—
(a)full body contact;
(b)frequent immersion by the face and trunk;
(c) frequent contact with spray by the face where it is likely some water will be swallowed or inhaled, or come into contact with ears, nasal passages, mucous membranes or cuts in the skin.

Examples—

diving, swimming, surfing
secondary recreational use, of water, means a use that involves the following types of contact with the water—
(a) contact in which only the limbs are regularly wet, and other contact, including the swallowing of water, is unusual;

Examples—

boating, fishing, wading
(b) occasional inadvertent immersion resulting from slipping or being swept into the water by a wave.
visual recreational use, of water, means a use that does not ordinarily involve any contact with the water.

Examples—

angling from the shore, sunbathing near water

7Environmental values for wetlands

(1)The environmental values for wetlands to be enhanced or protected under this policy are the qualities of a wetland that support and maintain the biodiversity of the wetland, including the following—
(a)the health of the wetland’s ecosystems;
(b)the wetland’s natural state and biological integrity;
(c)the presence of distinct or unique features, endemic plants or animals and their habitats, including threatened wildlife and near threatened wildlife under the Nature Conservation Act 1992;
(d)the wetland’s natural hydrological cycle;
(e)the natural interaction of the wetland with other ecosystems, including other wetlands.
(2)In this section—
biodiversity means natural diversity of living organisms, together with the environmental conditions and processes necessary for their survival, and includes each of the following—
(a)ecosystem diversity, that is, the diversity of the different types of communities formed by living organisms and the relations between them;
(b)species diversity, that is, the diversity of species;
(c)genetic diversity, that is, the diversity of genes within each species.

8Indicators and water quality guidelines for environmental values for waters

(1)An indicator for an environmental value for water is a physical, chemical, biological or other property that can be measured or decided in a quantitative way.

Examples—

1The concentration of nutrients and pH value are types of chemical indicators.
2Secchi disc clarity and temperature are types of physical indicators.
3Seagrass depth range, macroinvertebrate family richness and percentage of exotic fish are types of biological indicators.
(2)Water quality guidelines are quantitative measures or statements for indicators, including, for example, the concentration or load of a contaminant of water, that protect a stated environmental value.
(3)For particular water, the indicators and water quality guidelines for an environmental value are—
(a)decided using the following documents—
(i)site-specific documents for the water;
(ii)the document called ‘Queensland water quality guidelines 2009’, published on the department’s website;
(iii)the document called ‘Australian and New Zealand guidelines for fresh and marine water quality’, published in October 2018;
(iv)the document called ‘Australian drinking water guidelines, paper 6, national water quality management strategy’, dated 2011 and published on the National Health and Medical Research Council’s website;
(v)the document called ‘Guidelines for managing risks in recreational waters’, dated 2008 and published on the National Health and Medical Research Council’s website;
(vi)other relevant documents published by a recognised entity; or
(b)for water mentioned in schedule 1, column 1—the indicators stated in the document opposite the water in schedule 1, column 2.
(4)To the extent of any inconsistency between the documents mentioned in subsection (3)(a) for a particular water quality guideline, the documents are to be used in the order in which they are listed in that subsection.
(5)In this section—
load, of a contaminant of water, means the mass of the contaminant in the water measured over a period of time.
site-specific document, for water, means a document that—
(a)contains specific information about the water, or part of the water; and
(b)is recognised by the chief executive as having appropriate scientific authority.

9When environmental values of water are protected

For this policy, the environmental values for particular waters are protected if the measures for all indicators comply with the water quality guidelines stated for the indicators.

Part 4 Management goals and water quality objectives for waters

10Management goals for waters

The management goals for waters mentioned in schedule 1, column 1 are the goals, if any, stated in the document opposite the water in schedule 1, column 2.

Examples of management goals—

to maintain an area, composition and condition of seagrass beds, reefs or mangroves
to maintain a stated level of diversity of fish species

11Water quality objectives for waters

(1)This section and schedule 1 state the water quality objectives for waters to be achieved and maintained under this policy.
(2)The water quality objectives for water mentioned in schedule 1, column 1 are—
(a)the objectives stated in the document opposite the water in schedule 1, column 2; or
(b)if water quality objectives for the water are not stated in the document—the set of water quality guidelines that will protect all environmental values stated in the document.
(3)The water quality objectives for water not mentioned in schedule 1, column 1 are the set of water quality guidelines for all indicators that will protect all environmental values for the water.
(4)However, water quality objectives do not apply to—
(a)water in swimming pools; and
(b)drinking water in a domestic water supply system, including, for example, water in a local government or privately owned water supply system; and
(c)waste water in a storage, including, for example, a sewage lagoon, mine tailings dam, irrigation tailwater dam and piggery or dairy waste water pond; and
(d)water in a pond used for aquaculture; and
(e)water in a stormwater treatment system; and
(f)water in a device used for erosion and sediment control, including, for example, water in a sediment basin or sediment tank; and
(g)water in a privately owned dam, irrigation channel, pipeline or water tank.

12Identifying environmental values etc. for waters

(1)This section applies to water not mentioned in schedule 1, column 1.
(2)For developing a document about particular water that is to be included in schedule 1, the chief executive may identify—
(a)the environmental values to be protected for the water; and
(b)the water quality objectives for the water; and
(c)ways to improve the quality of the water.
(3)In identifying the matters mentioned in subsection (2), the chief executive must ensure there has been—
(a)consultation with the community, including industry and commerce sectors; and
(b)consideration of the economic and social impacts of protecting environmental values for the water.
(4)Also, the chief executive may identify water quality objectives for the water that provide a lower level of protection of the environmental values for the water than the water quality guidelines mentioned in section 11(2) only if—
(a)the adoption of the water quality guidelines would involve unacceptable economic or social impacts on the community; and
(b)the water quality objectives are an improvement on existing water quality.

13Amending waters in sch 1

(1)The chief executive may replace a document stated in schedule 1, column 2 for particular water only if—
(a)there has been consultation with the community, including industry and commerce sectors; and
(b)the chief executive has considered the economic and social impacts of protecting environmental values for the water.
(2)However, subsection (1) does not apply to a replacement document if—
(a)the purpose of the replacement is only to correct a minor error, or make another change that is not a change of substance; or
(b)the document being replaced states that an amendment of a stated type may be made to the document under this subsection, and the purpose of the replacement is only to make an amendment of the stated type.

Part 5 Management of activities

14Management hierarchy for surface or groundwater

(1)This section states the management hierarchy for an activity that may affect water.

Note—

See the Environmental Protection Regulation 2019, section 35.
(2)To the extent it is reasonable to do so, release of waste water or contaminants to waters must be dealt with in the following order of preference—
(a)firstly—reduce the production of waste water or contaminants by reducing the use of water;
(b)secondly—prevent waste and implement appropriate waste prevention measures;
(c)thirdly—evaluate treatment and recycling options and implement appropriate treatment and recycling;
(d)fourthly—evaluate the following options for waste water or contaminants in the order in which they are listed—
(i)appropriate treatment and release to a waste facility or sewer;
(ii)appropriate treatment and release to land;
(iii)appropriate treatment and release to surface waters or groundwaters.
(3)In this section—
appropriate treatment, of waste water or contaminants, means—
(a)for release to a sewerage service provider’s waste facility or sewer—treatment that meets the service provider’s requirements for the release to the waste facility or sewer; or
(b)for release to land—treatment that ensures the release to land is ecologically sustainable; or
(c)for release to surface waters or groundwaters—treatment that ensures, or the taking of other steps to ensure, that the release—
(i)will not affect the environmental values for the waters; or
(ii)is offset by undertaking an activity to counterbalance the impacts of releasing waste water or contaminants to waters, other than an offset to which the Environmental Offsets Act 2014 applies.
sewerage service provider see the Water Supply (Safety and Reliability) Act 2008, schedule 3.
waste facility means a facility for the recycling, reprocessing, treatment, storage, incineration, conversion to energy or disposal of waste.
waste prevention means the adoption of practices or processes that avoid generating waste or reduce the quantity of waste requiring subsequent treatment, recycling or disposal.

15Management intent for waters

(1)This section states the management intent for waters subject to an activity that involves the release of waste water or contaminants to the waters.
(2)It is the management intent for the waters that the decision to release the waste water or contaminant must ensure the following—
(a)for high ecological value waters—the measures for the indicators for all environmental values of waters are maintained;
(b)for slightly disturbed waters—the measures for the slightly modified physical or chemical indicators are progressively improved to achieve the water quality objectives for high ecological value water;
(c)for moderately disturbed waters—
(i)if the measures for the indicators for all environmental values achieve the water quality objectives for the water—the measures for the indicators are maintained at levels that achieve the water quality objectives for the water; or
(ii)if the measures for the indicators for all environmental values do not achieve the water quality objectives for the water—the measures for the indicators are improved to achieve the water quality objectives for the water;
(d)for highly disturbed waters—the measures for the indicators for all environmental values are progressively improved to achieve the water quality objectives for the water.

Part 6 Healthy waters management plans

16Healthy waters management plans

(1)The chief executive may develop and implement an environmental plan about water (a healthy waters management plan) to decide ways to improve the quality of the water.
(2)Also, a recognised entity, in cooperation with the chief executive, may develop and implement a healthy waters management plan.
(3)A healthy waters management plan for water must—
(a)describe the water to which the plan applies; and
(b)include an assessment of the following for the water—
(i)any threats to water-dependent ecosystems;
(ii)any matters that may adversely affect the use of the water as a supply of drinking water;
(iii)any matters that may adversely affect the natural flows of the water; and
(c)if environmental values and water quality objectives for the water are stated in a document mentioned in schedule 1, column 2—include the environmental values and water quality objectives; and
(d)if environmental values and water quality objectives have not been established for the water—include proposed environmental values, management goals and water quality guidelines for the water; and
(e)if a water plan under the Water Act 2000 applies to the water—include the environmental flow objectives for the plan and ecological outcomes stated in the plan for the water; and
(f)identify ways to protect the environmental values for the water, and to monitor and assess the effectiveness of the protection.
(4)In developing and implementing the plan, the chief executive or entity must have regard to any guidelines published by the department about healthy waters management plans.

Part 7 Functions of chief executive

17Community awareness and involvement

(1)This section applies if the chief executive decides to develop and implement a plan to—
(a)raise community awareness of issues about water quality; and
(b)involve the community in water quality management.
(2)The chief executive must consider including in the plan—
(a)a description of the issues about water quality; and
(b)ways to raise community awareness and understanding about water quality policy, planning and management; and
(c)ways to improve levels of community consultation in relation to water quality management, including consultation carried out under this policy; and
(d)ways to better inform the community of issues about water quality management.

18Ambient monitoring

(1)If the chief executive carries out a program of ambient monitoring of waters to assess the state of waters, the chief executive must—
(a)carry out the monitoring under—
(i)the document called ‘Monitoring and Sampling Manual 2018’, published on the department’s website; and
(ii)the ‘Australian and New Zealand guidelines for fresh and marine water quality’, published in October 2018; and
(b)publish the results of the monitoring on the department’s website; and
(c)prepare a report about the results of the monitoring.
(2)To the extent of any inconsistency between the documents mentioned in subsection (1)(a), the document mentioned in subsection (1)(a)(i) prevails.
(3)If practicable, a comparison of ambient monitoring results with the water quality objectives for, and freshwater flows to, the water during the time of the monitoring must be included in the report.
(4)Subsection (5) applies if the measure of an indicator does not comply with a water quality objective because the noncompliance is caused by the natural properties of the water.
(5)For preparing the report, the measure of the indicator is taken to comply with the water quality objective if, at the time the indicator is measured, the measure of the indicator is within the natural background level, as determined under the monitoring program, for the indicator.
(6)If the results of monitoring show the water quality objectives for the water have not been met, the chief executive may investigate the reasons why the water fails to meet the water quality objectives.
(7)In this section—
ambient monitoring, of water, includes assessing, analysing, examining, inspecting, measuring or reporting on the following—
(a)the quantity, quality and characteristics of water;
(b)the effectiveness of control, remedial or rehabilitation measures on the matters mentioned in paragraph (a).

19Amendment of Map of Queensland wetland environmental values

(1)The chief executive may amend the Map of Queensland wetland environmental values only if the amendment is made because—
(a)more accurate information indicating the extent, hydrological type or ecological significance of the wetland has become available; or
(b)the chief executive considers that the ecological significance of a wetland has changed.
(2)If the chief executive amends the map under subsection (1), the chief executive must—
(a)fix a new edition number to the amended map; and
(b)publish the amended map on the department’s website.

Part 8 Miscellaneous

20Operation of sch 1

The boundaries of water mentioned in schedule 1, column 1 are the boundaries identified in the document stated opposite the water in schedule 1, column 2.

Editor’s note—

The documents mentioned in schedule 1 are published on the department’s website.

Part 9 Repeal

21Repeal

The Environmental Protection (Water) Policy 2009, SL No. 178 is repealed.

Schedule 1 Environmental values and water quality objectives for waters

sections 6(1)(a), 8(3)(b), 10 and 11

Column 1

Water

Column 2

Document

Name

Description

 

Burnett, Mary and Great Sandy regions

Burrum, Gregory, Isis, Cherwell and Elliott rivers, including all Hervey Bay coastal rivers and creeks

basin 137

Burrum, Gregory, Isis, Cherwell and Elliott Rivers Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Fraser Island waters

basin 139

Fraser Island Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Great Sandy Strait and coastal creeks

part of basin 140 and adjacent to basins 137, 138 and 139

Great Sandy Strait and Coastal Creeks Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Hervey Bay

adjacent to basins 137 and 139

Hervey Bay Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Mary River, including all tributaries of the river

basin 138

Mary River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Capricorn, Curtis Coast and Gladstone regions

Boyne River basin, including all waters of the basin

basin 133

Curtis Island, Calliope River and Boyne River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Calliope River basin, including all waters of the basin, the Fitzroy delta, waters of Balaclava Island, the Narrows, Port Curtis, Gladstone Harbour and adjacent coastal waters

basin 132 and adjacent to basin 132

Curtis Island, Calliope River and Boyne River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Curtis Island basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 131

Curtis Island, Calliope River and Boyne River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Shoalwater Creek basin, including all waters of the basin, Shoalwater Bay and adjacent coastal waters

basin 128 and adjacent to basin 128

Styx River, Shoalwater Creek and Waterpark Creek Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Styx River basin, including all waters of the basin, Broad Sound and adjacent coastal waters

basin 127 and adjacent to basin 127

Styx River, Shoalwater Creek and Water Park Creek Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Water Park Creek basin, including all waters of the basin, Keppel Bay and adjacent coastal waters

basin 129 and adjacent to basin 129

Styx River, Shoalwater Creek and Water Park Creek Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Fitzroy region

Callide Creek, including all waters of the Callide Creek catchment within the Dawson River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Callide Creek Catchment Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Comet River, including all waters of the Comet River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Comet River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Dawson River, including all waters of the Dawson River sub-basin other than the Callide Creek catchment

part of basin 130

Dawson River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Fitzroy River, including all waters of the Fitzroy River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Fitzroy River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Isaac River, including all waters of the Isaac River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Isaac River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Mackenzie River, including all waters of the Mackenzie River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Mackenzie River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Nogoa River, including all waters of the Nogoa River sub-basin

part of basin 130

Nogoa River Sub-basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in September 2011

Mackay and Whitsundays regions

O’Connell River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 124

Proserpine River, Whitsunday Island and O’Connell River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Pioneer River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 125

Pioneer River and Plane Creek Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Plane Creek basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 126

Pioneer River and Plane Creek Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Proserpine River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 122

Proserpine River, Whitsunday Island and O’Connell River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Whitsunday Island basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 123

Proserpine River, Whitsunday Island and O’Connell River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

South East Queensland region

Albert River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 145

Albert River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Bremer River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 143

Bremer River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Brisbane creeks—Bramble Bay, including Bald Hills, Cabbage Tree, Downfall, Kedron Brook, Nudgee and Nundah creeks

part of basin 142

Brisbane Creeks—Bramble Bay Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Brisbane River, including all tributaries of the Brisbane River other than Bremer River, Lockyer Creek, Oxley Creek and Stanley River

part of basin 143

Brisbane River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Broadwater, including—

•  Biggera and Loders creeks
•  the Broadwater and all creeks of the Broadwater catchment
•  Runaway Bay

part of basin 146

Broadwater Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Caboolture River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 142

Caboolture River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Coomera River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 146

Coomera River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Currumbin and Tallebudgera creeks and Pacific Beaches, including—

•  all tributaries of Currumbin and Tallebudgera creeks
•  all creeks of the Pacific Beaches catchment

part of basin 146

Currumbin and Tallebudgera Creeks Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Lockyer Creek, including all tributaries of the creek

part of basin 143

Lockyer Creek Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Logan River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 145

Logan River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Maroochy River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 141

Maroochy River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Mooloolah River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 141

Mooloolah River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Moreton Bay

basin 144 and adjacent to basins 141 to 143, 145 and 146

Moreton Bay, North Stradbroke, South Stradbroke, Moreton and Moreton Bay Islands Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Nerang River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 146

Nerang River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Noosa River, including—

•  Kin Kin creek
•  Teewah coastal creeks
•  lakes Cooroibah, Cootharaba, Doonella and Weyba

part of basin 140

Noosa River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Oxley Creek, including all tributaries of the creek

part of basin 143

Oxley Creek Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Pimpama River, including—

•  Behm and McCoys creeks
•  southern Moreton Bay coastal creeks

part of basin 146

Pimpama River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Pine rivers and Redcliffe creeks, including—

•  Hays Inlet
•  all tributaries of the North Pine and South Pine rivers

part of basin 142

Pine Rivers and Redcliffe Creeks Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Pumicestone Passage, including—

•  waters of Bribie Island
•  Bells, Coochin, Dux, Elimbah, Mellum, Ningi and Tibrogargan creeks

part of basin 141

Pumicestone Passage Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Redland creeks, including Coolnwynpin, Eprapah, Hilliards, Lota, Moogurrapum, Tarradarrapin, Tingalpa and Wynnum creeks

part of basin 145

Redland Creeks Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Sandy, Six Mile, Wolston, Woogaroo and Goodna creeks, including all tributaries of the creeks

part of basin 143

Sandy, Six Mile, Wolston, Woogaroo and Goodna Creeks Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Stanley River, including all tributaries of the river

part of basin 143

Stanley River Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in July 2010

Townsville region

Black River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 117

Black River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Ross River basin, including all waters of the basin, Magnetic Island and adjacent coastal waters

basin 118

Ross River Basin and Magnetic Island Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in August 2013

Wet Tropics region

Barron River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 110 and adjacent to basin 110

Barron River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Daintree River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 108

Daintree and Mossman River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Herbert River basin, including all waters of the basin, Port of Lucinda and adjacent coastal waters

basin 116 and adjacent to basin 116

Herbert River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Hinchinbrook Island basin, including all waters of the basin, Port Hinchinbrook and adjacent coastal waters

basin 115

Tully River, Murray River and Hinchinbrook Island Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Johnstone River basin, including all waters of the basin, Port of Mourilyan and adjacent coastal waters

basin 112 and adjacent to basin 112

Johnstone River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Mossman River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 109

Daintree and Mossman River Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Mulgrave River, including all waters of the Mulgrave River sub-basin, Trinity Inlet and adjacent coastal waters

part of basin 111

Mulgrave-Russell River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Murray River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 114

Tully River, Murray River and Hinchinbrook Island Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Russell River, including all waters of the Russell River sub-basin and adjacent coastal waters

part of basin 111

Mulgrave-Russell River Basin Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Tully River basin, including all waters of the basin and adjacent coastal waters

basin 113

Tully River, Murray River and Hinchinbrook Island Basins Environmental Values and Water Quality Objectives, published by the department in November 2014

Editor’s note—

A copy of each plan may be inspected on the department’s website.

Schedule 2 Dictionary

section 3

aquatic ecosystem means a community of organisms living within or adjacent to water, including riparian or foreshore areas.
basin, followed by a number, means the river basin of that number described in ‘Australia’s River Basins 1997’, 3rd edition, made by Geoscience Australia, Commonwealth of Australia, in 2004.

Editor’s note—

The map is available on the department’s website.
biological integrity, for water or a wetland, means the ability of the water or wetland to support and maintain a balanced, integrative, adaptive community of organisms having a species composition, diversity and functional organisation comparable to that of the natural habitat of the locality in which the water or wetland is situated.

Examples of biological integrity of water or a wetland—

the intrinsic value of an aquatic ecosystem that is effectively unmodified or highly valued
its ability to support associated wildlife
its ability to produce food for human consumption
contaminated stormwater means stormwater that contains a contaminant.
environmental values
(a)for water—means the environmental values mentioned in section 6; or
(b)for wetlands—means the environmental values mentioned in section 7.
groundwater means water that occurs naturally in, or is introduced artificially into, an aquifer.
healthy waters management plan see section 16(1).
high ecological value waters means waters in which the biological integrity of the water is effectively unmodified or highly valued.
highly disturbed waters means waters that are significantly degraded by human activity and have lower ecological value than high ecological value waters or slightly or moderately disturbed waters.
indicator see section 8(1).
Map of Queensland wetland environmental values means the document called ‘Map of Queensland wetlands environmental values’, made by the chief executive and published on the department’s website.
moderately disturbed waters means waters in which the biological integrity of the water is adversely affected by human activity to a relatively small but measurable degree.
Queensland regional NRM body means a Queensland regional natural resource management body under either—
(a)the Commonwealth program known as the ‘National Landcare Program’; or
(b)the Queensland program known as the ‘Natural Resources Investment Program’.
recognised entity means—
(a)a local government; or
(b)a public sector unit; or
(c)an agency of the Commonwealth, another State or a foreign country, however called, with similar functions to the functions of the chief executive under this policy; or
(d)a ministerial council established by the Council of Australian Governments; or
(e)the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation; or
(f)a research centre completely or partly funded by the Queensland or the Commonwealth; or
(g)an Australian university; or
(h)a Queensland regional NRM body.
recycling, of waste water, means—
(a)re-using the waste water in the process that generated it; or
(b)reprocessing the waste water to develop a new product; or
(c)using the waste water, whether on or off the site where it is generated.
slightly disturbed waters means waters that have the biological integrity of high ecological value waters with slightly modified physical or chemical indicators but effectively unmodified biological indicators.
surface waters means waters other than groundwaters.
waste water means aqueous waste, and includes contaminated stormwater.
water quality guidelines see section 8(2).
water quality objectives, for water, are the objectives identified under section 11 for protecting the environmental values for the water.
waters
(a)includes the bed and banks of waters; and
(b)without limiting the Acts Interpretation Act 1954, schedule 1, definition Queensland waters, includes—
(i)surface water; and
(ii)groundwater.
wetland means an area shown as a wetland on the Map of Queensland wetland environmental values.